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Getting Over A Relationship With A Narcissist

by | December 19, 2015

I bet you have asked yourself this question at least a hundred times, “Why is it so hard to get over a narcissist?”. It probably doesn’t make much sense to you why you’re struggling so hard to move on from someone whose rap sheet of wrongdoings toward you is a mile long. It should be easy to let go of someone who has caused you so much pain, right? Well, not really, when you understand the interplay of factors that contribute to the concept of cognitive dissonance.

Cognitive dissonance can be viewed as a Grand Canyon-sized gap, between our beliefs and new data that is presented (facts). It’s the difficulty accepting what you believed to be true, is false. Mental conflict and confusion arise when the beliefs we hold so firmly and the new facts, contradict each other. Dissolving the cognitive dissonance, by challenging the conflicting information, is the cornerstone of recovery from narcissistic abuse.

Here’s how it works.

The love-bombing of the idealization stage of a toxic relationship sows the initial seeds of cognitive dissonance. The narcissist fakes being the ideal partner by saying and doing all the right things. They pretend to be everything we ever dreamed of and shower us with promises of perfect and eternal love. We are conned into believing the narcissist is the best partner we’ve ever had and the most wonderful person on the planet. We trust their promises and believe they’re able to love wholeheartedly, and without limits, in the same way, we do.

We fall madly in love, and our brains become drenched in a potent cocktail of love-bombing, and the pleasure-inducing chemicals, that are released by neurotransmitters in our brains, when we are in love. This potent cocktail is what germinates the seeds of cognitive dissonance, which were planted in our minds, during the idealization stage.

By the time the devaluation stage occurs, and the narcissist’s behavior begins to deviate from the way they first acted, our positive regard for them, and our beliefs about their good character and intentions, have grown like weeds that have permeated, and become firmly rooted throughout our minds.

To reduce the mental stress and confusion of having beliefs of positive regard, which are challenged by the new facts, we instinctively try to reestablish congruity and close the gap between our original beliefs, and the new data. We subconsciously use defense mechanisms to protect ourselves from facing reality we’re not quite ready to deal with. So, we reject the facts (denial). We explain them away (rationalize), or ignore the new information altogether. We may try to convince ourselves that no conflict really exists, and the problem must be our fault. Or, we may attempt to reconcile the distance between our beliefs and the new facts, through easing the gap, by focusing on our memories of how the narcissist used to be.

Since narcissistic abuse is characterized by various forms of ambient or stealth abuse, such as gaslighting, triangulation, intermittent reinforcement, and projection, the more covert and crafty the narcissist is, the more difficult it can be to dissolve the cognitive dissonance. The reason being, is the intensity, and power of the positive image of the narcissist we adopted during the love-bombing stage, is so embedded in our minds, that it appears more believable to us, than the reality of the ambiguous abuse we experienced, but aren’t able to quite put the finger on. So when the narcissist shocks us from time to time with more overt cruelty, we are inclined to engage in some of the defensive maneuvers mentioned earlier to resolve the inconsistency and discrepancy of their actions.

This is the reason why so many victims of narcissistic abuse have tremendous difficulty getting over the narcissist or leaving their abusive relationships for good, and instead continue to become trapped in the vicious seduce/discard cycle, even though they know their relationship is toxic.

One of the main focal points of therapy in my psychotherapy practice, with narcissistic abuse victims, is to help dissolve the cognitive dissonance, through the therapeutic use of Cognitive Behavioral techniques, and narrative therapy. These modalities, combined with education, about Narcissistic Personality Disorder, are effective at helping the survivor finally disentangle the facts from the fiction in their relationships. By clearing out the weeds from their minds, which are akin to clarifying their beliefs about the narcissist, and replacing them with new beliefs, based on the new data and facts, the cognitive dissonance resolves, freeing the survivor from the stranglehold of their cognitive dissonance for good.

Copyright © 2015 Bree Bonchay.  All Rights Reserved

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Bree Bonchay, LCSW, is a licensed psychotherapist with over 18 years of experience working in the field of mental health and trauma recovery. She specializes in helping people recover from toxic relationships. Her articles have been featured in major online magazines and she has appeared on radio as a guest expert.
She is a dedicated advocate, educator and facilitates survivor support groups and workshops.

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Healing stories about surviving toxic relationships with narcissists and sociopaths.

I bet you have asked yourself this question at least a hundred times, “Why is it so hard to get over a narcissist?”. It probably doesn’t make much sense to you why you’re struggling so hard to move on from someone whose rap sheet of wrongdoings toward you is a mile long. It should be easy to let go of someone who has caused you so much pain, right? Well, not really, when you understand the interplay of factors that contribute to the concept of cognitive dissonance.

Cognitive dissonance can be viewed as a Grand Canyon-sized gap, between our beliefs and new data that is presented (facts). It’s the difficulty accepting what you believed to be true, is false. Mental conflict and confusion arise when the beliefs we hold so firmly and the new facts, contradict each other. Dissolving the cognitive dissonance, by challenging the conflicting information, is the cornerstone of recovery from narcissistic abuse.

Here’s how it works.

The love-bombing of the idealization stage of a toxic relationship sows the initial seeds of cognitive dissonance. The narcissist fakes being the ideal partner by saying and doing all the right things. They pretend to be everything we ever dreamed of and shower us with promises of perfect and eternal love. We are conned into believing the narcissist is the best partner we’ve ever had and the most wonderful person on the planet. We trust their promises and believe they’re able to love wholeheartedly, and without limits, in the same way, we do.

We fall madly in love, and our brains become drenched in a potent cocktail of love-bombing, and the pleasure-inducing chemicals, that are released by neurotransmitters in our brains, when we are in love. This potent cocktail is what germinates the seeds of cognitive dissonance, which were planted in our minds, during the idealization stage.

By the time the devaluation stage occurs, and the narcissist’s behavior begins to deviate from the way they first acted, our positive regard for them, and our beliefs about their good character and intentions, have grown like weeds that have permeated, and become firmly rooted throughout our minds.

To reduce the mental stress and confusion of having beliefs of positive regard, which are challenged by the new facts, we instinctively try to reestablish congruity and close the gap between our original beliefs, and the new data. We subconsciously use defense mechanisms to protect ourselves from facing reality we’re not quite ready to deal with. So, we reject the facts (denial). We explain them away (rationalize), or ignore the new information altogether. We may try to convince ourselves that no conflict really exists, and the problem must be our fault. Or, we may attempt to reconcile the distance between our beliefs and the new facts, through easing the gap, by focusing on our memories of how the narcissist used to be.

Since narcissistic abuse is characterized by various forms of ambient or stealth abuse, such as gaslighting, triangulation, intermittent reinforcement, and projection, the more covert and crafty the narcissist is, the more difficult it can be to dissolve the cognitive dissonance. The reason being, is the intensity, and power of the positive image of the narcissist we adopted during the love-bombing stage, is so embedded in our minds, that it appears more believable to us, than the reality of the ambiguous abuse we experienced, but aren’t able to quite put the finger on. So when the narcissist shocks us from time to time with more overt cruelty, we are inclined to engage in some of the defensive maneuvers mentioned earlier to resolve the inconsistency and discrepancy of their actions.

This is the reason why so many victims of narcissistic abuse have tremendous difficulty getting over the narcissist or leaving their abusive relationships for good, and instead continue to become trapped in the vicious seduce/discard cycle, even though they know their relationship is toxic.

One of the main focal points of therapy in my psychotherapy practice, with narcissistic abuse victims, is to help dissolve the cognitive dissonance, through the therapeutic use of Cognitive Behavioral techniques, and narrative therapy. These modalities, combined with education, about Narcissistic Personality Disorder, are effective at helping the survivor finally disentangle the facts from the fiction in their relationships. By clearing out the weeds from their minds, which are akin to clarifying their beliefs about the narcissist, and replacing them with new beliefs, based on the new data and facts, the cognitive dissonance resolves, freeing the survivor from the stranglehold of their cognitive dissonance for good.

Copyright © 2015 Bree Bonchay.  All Rights Reserved

Suffering from Narcissistic Abuse?

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My blood pressure rises every time I see quotes or memes like the one below, especially when they are written by individuals who provide relationship advice like the writer of the one included in this post.There are so many horrendous inaccuracies and faulty assumptions in the meme/statement below.And, sadly it’s these types of memes/beliefs that contribute to keeping narcissistic abuse victims stuck in and returning to abusive relationships. Statements like these echo the very WORDS of abusers. If you’ve been in an abusive relationship, you know.Words that are deliberately delivered to distract the attention away from the abuser’s behavior and keep the victim focused on his/her alleged flaws. Also, if the statement was true, why is it that manipulative and controlling people are often not fooled or easily controlled by other manipulators?Is it because manipulative people have healthy self-love?Is it because they’re emotionally healthy and sovereign?Of course not. It’s because they can easily spot the tactics that they themselves use. Simple.When dangerous advice and memes like this are so negligently tossed around, it’s no wonder why there are so many victims of manipulators.This type of advice offers the wrong diagnosis, the wrong solution, and gives individuals a false sense of protection.Let’s remember that manipulation by its nature means that manipulation is invisible and occurs just below the level of consciousness. If manipulation could be easily detected, then it wouldn’t be manipulation. It would be obvious.I’m not knocking self-love. It’s critical to well-being, but if you’ve been in an abusive relationship for any length of time, your self-confidence and self-esteem has surely been attacked and insidiously diminished, meaning it’s inevitable that your self-love will suffer.If you know anything about manipulators and controllers, then you know that many of their victims are targeted for what they have, not for what they lack. And, according to research from The Institute for Relational Harm Reduction, many narcissistic abuse survivors have the same cluster of trait elevations- agreeableness, conscienceness and openness/empathy.So, if you’ve been the victim of someone who is highly manipulative, controlling, and/or has a personality disorder that impairs their empathy or conscience, don’t assume it’s because you’re lacking anything. Instead, consider what you have in abundance.Even the leading expert in psychopathy, Dr. Robert Hare, has said that he can still be fooled and conned.We need to get the correct information and helpful advice out there. That’s why I’m including a book plug in this post.If you are stuck in an abusive relationship or know someone who is, check out Kristen Milstead’s book, “Why Can't I Just Leave: A Guide to Waking Up and Walking Out of a Pathological Love Relationship”.Kristen asked me if I would review her book and here’s what I had to say:"Kristen Milstead provides a social psychological analysis of narcissistic abuse using the empathetic voice of a survivor. Survivors who read this book will be able to trust the "lightbulb" moments this rare perspective offers." Kristen has a doctorate in sociology and uses the stories of survivors and social psychological research on compliance, cognitive dissonance, and thought control.Here’s what the description on Amazon says, “Why Can’t I Just Leave? explains how relationships with pathological partners can create impossible dilemmas that trap you in a distorted dream-state and hijack your thoughts and emotions. Learn what those who are conscience-impaired don’t want you to know and find out how to wake up and walk out of your partner’s invisible prison forever.”Let’s empower ourselves and others and make 2022 the best year yet! XO ... See MoreSee Less
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Thank you, Grow Theraoy, for my #livelyroot Money Tree plant. 🌱 I think it looks great in my office. ... See MoreSee Less
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💯 🎯💯🎯💯🎯💯🎯💯🎯💯And, it’s equally not helpful to say “it takes two to tango”. #narcissisticabuseawareness #wnaad #ifmywoundswerevisible #narcissisticabuserecovery #narcissisticabuse #coercivecontrol ... See MoreSee Less
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“Have you been in a relationship with someone you think had narcissistic and/or psychopathic traits? If you are 21 years old and over and reside in the United States, you are eligible to participate in a research study investigating the impact of romantic relationships with narcissists and psychopaths. You can use the link: tinyurl.com/narcissist-survey to take the survey. The purpose of this study is to gain an understanding of the psychological well-being and trauma-related symptoms of those who have been involved in romantic relationships with individuals with narcissistic and psychopathic traits. You will take an anonymous survey which will request basic demographic information, ask you to self-report on scales concerning information about your past relationship experiences, trauma and abuse experiences, the personality characteristics of an ex-partner or current partner you believe had narcissistic, and/or psychopathic traits, and trauma-related symptoms.Please note: this is a study conducted by Shahida Arabi, a graduate student at Harvard University. I am not affiliated in any way with the research being conducted nor am I part of the research study team. You are not obligated to take part in this study and should do so only out of your own interest in contributing to this research. You will not be paid for your participation or receive any benefits from me for taking part in the survey. All questions and concerns regarding the study can be directed to the principal investigator.”Thank you so much! ... See MoreSee Less
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Get the book

‘I Am Free” is both a cautionary warning and illuminating light. It empowers readers dealing with the aftermath of a toxic relationship and serves as a wake-up call to those who are in-or think they may be in- an abusive relationship with a narcissists or sociopath.

Get the book

‘I Am Free” is both a cautionary warning and illuminating light. It empowers readers dealing with the aftermath of a toxic relationship and serves as a wake-up call to those who are in-or think they may be in- an abusive relationship with a narcissists or sociopath.

About me

Bree Bonchay, MSW, LCSW, is a licensed psychotherapist with two decades of experience working in the field of mental health and trauma recovery. She specializes in helping people recover from toxic relationships and shares her insights about narcissistic personality disorder and psychopathy in her blog, FreeFromToxic. She is the author of the book, “I Am Free” and has appeared on radio as a guest expert. She is also a board member of the Association for NPD/Psychopathy Educators & Survivor Treatment, a member of the International Association of Trauma Specialists, and is also the founder of WNAAD.

About me

Bree Bonchay, MSW, LCSW, is a licensed psychotherapist with two decades of experience working in the field of mental health and trauma recovery. She specializes in helping people recover from toxic relationships and shares her insights about narcissistic personality disorder and psychopathy in her blog, FreeFromToxic. She is the author of the book, “I Am Free” and has appeared on radio as a guest expert. She is also a board member of the Association for NPD/Psychopathy Educators & Survivor Treatment, a member of the International Association of Trauma Specialists, and is also the founder of WNAAD.

20 Comments

  1. carmen

    STOVER is a very logical solution to dislodge from a husband/wife, lover narcissist. But what if the narcissist is your adult SON who was the most loving, considerate, intelligent only child up until he started trying to control me in his thirties, an now in his fifties the verbal abuse has become so brutal that I have called the police twice on him to remove him from my house.

    Reply
    • charlie

      join the club

      Reply
  2. Millie

    Thank you very much for such a great article. I had seen these words: “COGNITIVE DISSONANCE” so many times in different web pages and forums but I had never been able to understand this until now after I read your work. Now it is crystal clear to me, and I can relate to it, and realize that is precisely what happened to me, what I did, and why I stayed 10 years in a relationship that was destroying me, and I would have stayed even longer if he did not discard me.
    I can understand why I did not want to break free, why I fought to stay with him, why it took me so long to accept what he really is and to find peace.

    Thank you so much for explaining what COGNITIVE DISSONANCE is clearly, brightly.

    I am so happy and thankful for having found your Website. It is by far, the best of all what I have found and that has helped me the most, and believe me, all what I do in my free time is searching and searching the internet reading every article I find about these evil monsters, so I can tell I have read a lot and found lots of websites ever since he discarded me one year ago.

    Reply
    • Bree Bonchay, LCSW

      Hi Millie, I really happy I was able to explain the concept of cognitive dissonance in a way that made sense to you. And thank you for your kind words about my blog. I’m so glad my articles resonate with you. Stay free my friend. ~ Bree

      Reply
      • Millie

        Hi again Bree, thanks for replying.

        I wonder if you could please write a separate post about what CODEPENDENCY is.
        That is another thing that I have found everywhere but so far not fully understood clearly.

        Reply
        • Bree Bonchay, LCSW

          Hi Millie, I definitely will. It’s a great topic because not everyone who has found them self in a relationship with a narcopath is co-dependent. Thank you for the suggestion. Xx

  3. MDM

    I agree that cognitive dissonance was very well-explained here. We really learned something.Fine job.

    Reply
  4. Nettie

    Thank you so much Bree. Cognitive Dissonance. Absolutely brutal attack on everything that makes us, they break in us, self worth…annihilated, self respect…obliterated, and self esteem…destroyed.

    Reply
  5. Desiree

    Wow, this really helps me understand why I still hurt so much. It’s so twisted how they manipulate us to bond with them with the only intentions of crushing our spirits. I read an article recently on the frog in boiling water the other day which explained exactly how it felt only with a different idea. I described it as: Consider allowing someone to cradle you very heart, the actual organ, in their hands because they convinced you that it was the best thing for you and it was right. Imagine, them holding your heart ever so gently and tenderly in their grasp for such a long time. “Protecting” it. Keeping it “safe”. Then slowly, they starts to squeeze. So slow that you don’t really ever realize it. You just feel shorter of breath, like your chest is heavy. There is a huge weight on you now and you dont know why. When you ask them why you are feeling this way, they look you in your eyes so deeply and convince you that it’s your own fault or that it’s all in your head. Telling you he is not squeezing your heart, as he squeezes it tighter. Then tries to convince you that you need help, but doesn’t believe in any of the help that might cure you. He tells you how much he loves you and has plans for having such a picture perfect family. He tries to remind you of “how it used to be” and coyly throws in things like “before you did…..” before this person came I to our lives” before you got this friend…this job…etc”…. but remember how much we love each other? Never mind the names I just called you and how I played on all of your insecurities to throw them in your face…..and just remember what we “Love” about eachother. He has you tell him 10 things you love about him. This feeds him. Then it’s supposed to be his turn. But he only names physical things, the obvious, or copies what you said. This is because guys like that don’t have an original idea in their bodies. They’re straight up copy cats and try to play like their the best ever. Eventually he coaxed you into remenicing on the good things of the past. He squeezes tighter when he asks you, “why can’t you just be happy?”. If you are a Strong willed woman, not someone who thinks it’s just easier to try to “get along” and please your master, then you will catch on eventually. But then it’s tricky…..because you love him. He doesn’t know how that feels. But you do. So you want to fix it. Save it. So you do everything in your power to “fix you” and what’s wrong with you. But he doesn’t change. He squeezes harder because he feels his grasp of control slipping as you are awakening. You are the person who wants to make things right. He knows that, but will still tell you that you are wrong. Your still not doing things right. Why can’t you just be a good wife, mother, person? He squeezes harder. Your chest now hurts daily and you feel physically ill. Because stress can take a toll on the body no matter how young you are. You try to find time to yourself but he’s catching on. He doesn’t want you to have enough time to actually process what’s really going on. So he invades all of your boundaries. You now can’t even go to the bathroom without him exploiting you in any way possible. Even if it’s to tell your children he doesnt know why you always have to do this…..insert blame here…..he squeezes harder. You try to confront him about his behavior and hope he realizes how much he is hurting you. But he laughs in your face and mocks you. Even when you have tears streaking your face he mocks you. He tells you that words are just “sticks and stones”. Then turns it around on you that you’re now causing a fight. Why can’t you just be happy? He squeezes harder. Then releases just a tiny bit to remind you of how it used to be. To remenice again. Tears streaking down your face, eyes swollen from crying so much. He kisses you and tells you how beautiful you are when you cry. That’s when you realize he is enjoying every bit of this. Your fight or flight instincts kick in. You realize the only way you will survive is by getting out and away from him. You think, “if I leave maybe he will realize what he did wrong”. As you carefully plan your escape, your heart is now bleeding all over the floor. He squeezes harder because you are slipping away. The moment he realizes you are done, if he does, he practically forces you to leave by being extremely emotionally abusive and manipulative. Pulling you and pushing you at the same time. Confusion. When your heart finally bursts from all of the pressure from being inside his grasp, is when he has discarded you. Telling you to leave, telling you that he doesn’t want you any more like a toy he’s done playing with. Or when you leave, if he paid no mind to it, he cuts you off from all contact with him. Either way, he makes you feel worthless, undesired, unwanted, unloved, and abandoned. And blames you for it. Even after realizing all of this, it’s been 3 years, and I still find myself getting entangled in an arguement on the phone that he runs the circle on because I actually have feelings so I get mad, while while he laughs then tries to redirect me. I’m still learning how to not allow myself to care so much about him. It’s hard though. Because I took my heart back. Every day is still a struggle. I have to be stern am actually discipline myself to Not engage in any sort of conversation with him. I still fail at that he because it’s hard to not communicate with someone you share your children with.

    Reply
    • jini

      hi desiree..all u have described is all what i also endured,pls understand this takes time to digest and reorient our lives,i know its easier said than done,but understand that you truly loved him,and also suggest yourself that u can love him much better and truly and genuinely from far..,this way u are your true self in loving him,becoz u are manipulated if close,so you loose yourself,so just be compassionate to ur own self first understand that you have be your authentic version,and that is possible only from far and not while near to him,u dont try to conveine him of ur love,but just love them as deeply as u always did but silently,and if ever u have to attend them tend them with compassion..try this.,believe me.,it will soothe your nerves little by litte,have dreams of your own,what all u wanted to acheive in ur life,think that this is the best time where u can focus on ur passions and goals,just be there all yourself,relish the soulfulness u fell and where there id no distraction..,you are all yours,now.
      try to feel your soul.,just shower all the love u did for him on yourself..,feel the divinity in your soul.

      Reply
  6. darktippedrose

    kind of confusing to understand. would this be like when you’re not sure if you’re good memories were even real – because they happened when you didn’t know when you were being controlled?

    Reply
    • Bree Bonchay, LCSW

      The power and intensity of the idealization stage is much stronger in shaping our beliefs than the covert nature of the abuse in the devaluation stage. The manipulation and tactics of devaluation stage is what further destroys our ability to tell truth from fiction causing doubt.

      So when the narcissists does something more overtly cruel, we engage in defensive maneuvers that attempt to restore congruity in our world and about about our original beliefs about the narcissist.

      The positive beliefs in the beginning are vivid, concrete and very clear to us. So instinctively we try to justify the narc’s cruel actions to be in alignment with the stronger belief system. Hope that helps.

      Reply
      • darktippedrose

        still kind of confusing but I’m getting there. With my husband, I was married for 7 years before I woke up and realized what happened. I didn’t know how it happened. I was sooooo isolated, and neck deep in it. It was crazy. I was a shadow of who I really am. It felt crazy.

        Reply
        • Chris

          I know exactly what you mean.

  7. Cherylynn Valentino

    Aft er 5 7yr s of being at my mother’s beck and call as well as my siblings.
    I asked her a question a therapist ha DC w z nte DC me to a ask.
    W ef ll that w a s the beginning of the end

    No Mom, no sis and one daughter will not speak to me either.
    I’m not going back to them after I see what limited emotional life they have for me.
    AND my daughter is getting msrrie DC and has invited all of them.
    I feel completely alone and overwhelmed.
    U SHOULD feel sooo happy about this wedding. However,as I stated previously,
    I feel alone az n DC overwhelmed.

    Reply
  8. PEGGY MIZE

    After 25 years of being abused by a narcissisic sociopath, the blog being love bombed in the beginning and then moving on to more sinister abuse and making me look like I am the abuser or i was the one always at fault. Describing what we believed and what was really truth, and learning to recognize truth, was a turning point in my life. All the while , he was stealing from me, lying to me and hiding assets. It was only when i stopped allowing him to control me, that things really fell apart. He held a broken glass to my face a few years ago and when I left him, he begged me to come home and he would never do that again. I acame home. He convinced me that he would never touch me in a harmful way. After another episode that left me so scared for my life,I left again. Once more, he convinced me that he would get counseling, see a dr, do anything i wanted him to do.. If i would just come home. All his promises lasted about 2 months. He was making a plan to really financially do me in this time but when he lost his temper this time and attempted to strangle me, i got away and called 911 and he spent the night in jail. Since that day, i have not spoken a word to him and while researching financial records for the divorce, I have a monumental amount of information that I was clueless about because he was the best liar in the world. His acting was superb. The blogs from your readers has been so helpful and I am beginning to heal. He has tried to contact me, but I refuse to even speak a word to him. That would be a victory in his eyes. Still a ways to go but I will get there. I have a strong support group and my Church Family and most of all God to lean on through this dark period of my life. Being 75 makes it all the worse. If i were younger and had time to rebuild a life, that would be encouraging. I will make the most of what I have left.

    Reply
  9. joicelizsabeth

    I’m struggling with this, more knowledge more power. Thank you for helping me to understand this place that I seem to be stuck in.❤

    Reply
  10. Debbie

    More of a question than a comment. My 33 yr old daughter who is bisexual, started a new relationship at the beginning of this yr. I was caring for my granddaughter after school until the end of the school yr, she is six. I have cared for her since she was 11 months old , while my daughter went to work. Basically, I have been discarded, by my N daughter. Problem being, we are a very small family, I am the only grandparent in the picture. We live in same town, maybe 6 km apart. I feel that my granddaughter and I ( and her 2 uncles, and great- grandparents) NEED to have a relationship!! We are basically the only sane family that she has. The new girlfriend is a big concern if she comes into this supporting my daughters decisions. She has to realize that there are 2 sides to every story! I have no idea what my fighter has told her to justify her disowning her family?!?! I am so worried about my granddaughter !! My kids were raised by a narcissist . I can’t stand by and let her screw with my granddaughters mental health and well- being!!! What does Gramma do!?!!??

    Reply

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Copyright © 2021 - Bree Bonchay/ Free From Toxic ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No material on this website may be reproduced in any format without prior written permission of Bree Bonchay.